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Archive for November, 2014

 

 

cinelli stem badge

cinelli stem badge

The Recyclist’s bikey-nose sniffed out this beautiful steel Cinelli stem in a dusty Lambton garage – and on a tipoff.

Apparently Cinelli originally coloured their brass badges with fired glass enamelling ( cloisonne ), then later stem badges such as this ( and the head badges ) were painted, probably because of cost, again later finally moving to aluminium head badges, decals, simple engraving etc. in more modern times.

It is a miniature of the early Cinelli head badge “knight and shield” crest.
Current Cinelli products use the newer familiar graphic “winged C” motif.

as found - shame about the 'bars

as found – shame about the ‘bars

This long reach stem was connected to some Cinelli steel drop bars ( possibly Giro d’Italia model ) though these aren’t in useable condition having rusted through in the drops area. I’m guessing 1950s to 1960s, but can’t be sure.

many years of neglect ...

many years of neglect …

I think this is the 65 degree track stem – they also made a 73deg road stem and a drooping 58deg more extreme track version as well. Condition is not great and the stem bolt is somewhat rounded off – nevertheless, these are highly collectable items.

on the popular

on the popular

It now graces my ’56 Speedwell Popular, a somewhat mundane (but faithful) steed for such a regal stem.  At least the vintage is about right !

I fitted a steel Kusuki ‘Win’ Randonneur bar, as its shape and finish are about the best match I have for this stem.

love it !

love it !

A set of curly rams-horn style steel drop bars would look great – if I can find some !

a laid back frame

a laid back frame

The laid back angles of this bike mean that the stem drop is not so pronounced, and the rando bars give back a little height.

some traces of original paint remain

some traces of original paint remain

In spite of ( or partly because of ) its worn paint condition and less than perfect chrome, it is still a thing of beauty to behold …

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the 'black and white TV' of  cycle computers ?

not exactly an ‘SRM’ — more the ‘black and white TV’ of cycle computers..

Heavy, bulky, and not very accurate were my first impressions from this recent find, but perhaps in the 1980s it was state of the art ? The device runs on 2 x AA batteries ( which were thankfully not too corrosive to have destroyed it – despite it having being unused for over 10 years ).

cateye velo & road king ( new version ! )

cateye velo & road king ( preview of new version ! )

The CC-1000 lacks a clock display, though it does have a stopwatch function. There is an SCN setting that cycles through all the displays – far too quickly for me – plus ODO, DST, SPD, Time, AVS & MXS readings. Speed is indicated by an LCD bar graph at the top of the display just below the coloured speed line, as well as numerically when set on the ‘SPD’ setting. LCD icons appear above each function’s abbreviation to indicate which display is operating.

rear of unit

rear of unit

In use, the speedo’s response is very slow, and somewhat pessimistic on speed and distance – compared with my modern computers. The sender is a ring attached at 3 points to the front wheel spokes, with different screw holes supplied for 36 spoke and 28 spoke wheels.

computer ring and sensor

computer ring and sensor

The 3 buttons are ‘MODE’ “RESET” and “START/STOP”. An adjuster on the back has presets for 20, 22, 24, 26, 27 and 28 inch wheels ( no 700c ! ). According to Velobase it came with an adjusting tool for the wheel size presets, and a carry pouch !

the wheel size adjuster

the wheel size adjuster

I find the stopwatch function useful for trip times, but really, the best use of this classic computer is to make an 80s rebuild like my 59cm Road King look and feel a little more period authentic ! More about this bike later ..

road king 'semi-tourist'

road king ‘semi-tourist’

Happy Re-cycling !

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