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Archive for October, 2015

mystery loop frame

mystery loop frame

Thanks to fellow bike restorer Patrick Calmels from Tassie, i have managed to free the stubborn fixed cup. As he suggested in the comments of the previous post, using a large bolt through the cup ( along with plenty of Reducteur H-72 Releasing Agent ….  it’s available from Bunnings, though not cheap ! ) …  and the cup is free !

home-made fixed cup tool

home-made fixed cup tool

bingo !

bingo ! cup removed

The main difficulties to removing fixed cups are either not getting good leverage with a tool, and / or not getting a safe grip – and in the case of this cup, no spanner flats – only two pinholes. These offer very little hold for any pin spanner, with the likelihood of barked knuckles following a slip. This homemade tool is an approx. 18mm bolt with a number of washer spacers, to be used with a ring or socket spanner.

was it once an oil-bath ?

was it once an oil-bath ?

As Patrick suggested, tightening the bolt clockwise actually loosens the left handed thread naturally. I was worried at first that the bearing surface might be damaged, but it was fine.

This tool wouldn’t work on the left side adjustable cup unless one used a left hand threaded bolt, but I find it’s usually the right side fixed cup that gives most trouble.
On a bike that could be up to 7 or 8 decades old, the bearing surfaces are all shiny and un-pitted, even more remarkable in an unsealed bracket which is open to both internal and external grit. An explanation might be that the oil port was used frequently to top it up, as there is a lot of dried lubricant all over the inside of the BB shell. The cups are Bramptons and the axle is a Bayliss-Wiley No. 14.

typical period crank-set

typical period crank-set

i'm not losing sleep now !

i’m not losing sleep now !

There are no markings to identify the crank set, though it uses the same 5-pin arrangement to remove the chain ring that is used on the Williams and Utility brands I’ve seen on similar old bikes.

getting there..

getting there..

I used citrus paint stripper, steel pot scourers and an old knife to remove the light blue enamel, which has revealed a  very tiny amount of the original finish – dark blue, with orange and white ( or cream ) highlights.

cool bananas !

cool bananas !  a limited edition

There was rough surface rust under the paint, so it needs more work yet, but have a look at that serial number on the seat lug No. “165” – cool bananas !

neat dropouts

neat dropouts

f & f

f & f

So far, so good !

See Ya…

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loop frame - as found

The last day of the spring heatwave and I’m out early, spinning on the Shogun, before the worst of the furnace.

It’s still chuck out season here, but there’s slim pickings so far. Yet something made me double back, and in the last dead end of the last street, with council pickup trucks circling ominously, I spotted this bike.

graceful curves

a graceful curve – if one ignores the lever

Always a sucker for an old loop frame I did the time trial thing back to the van and, dripping with perspiration, returned to the scene.

no-name centrepull

no-name steel centrepull brake

It was still there !

original bayliss-wiley hub with oil port

original bayliss-wiley hub with oil port

Sadly, it has been repainted and covered with cheap looking “Belmont” decals, so I may never know what it was. It is a typical old Aussie bike with 28″ ( that’s the 642mm version } 700A wheels.

While the front wheel is 32H the rear is a 36H, rather than the typical 40H, and sports a Shimano coaster brake. The rims and other chrome have been silver over-painted.

mid 70s shimano coaster

mid 70s shimano coaster

The frame looks pre-1950s to me and I wondered if the wheels were updated later, yet the front hub sports an oil port, and the locking flanges match the fork perfectly.

this is an obvious addition - as there's no hole in the bridge !

this is an obvious addition – as there’s no hole in the bridge !

I’m certain that both the hand brakes are late additions, and of course the plastic saddle and  the chromed fenders are too.

In fact, I’m beginning to think that the old bike was refurbished around the mid 1970s and given a new back wheel.

The front hub is a Bayliss-Wiley – probably original – and there is paint on the rim underneath the silver that is not present on the rear.

never seen one of these - in aluminium !

never seen one of these before – in aluminium too ! i’ve no idea if it’s original ..

looks like a williams but with no markings ...

looks like a williams, but with no markings …

Other interesting features include a patterned cut away aluminium ( ! ) chain guard, the unusual horizontal rear drop outs, the elegantly curved handlebars with their dainty short cut-off and stubby green Italian plastic grips. The seat stays are bolted to the drop-outs but fixed to the seat tube. I have seen similar drop-outs on 1930s bikes and I’m now thinking that this frame may be the oldest one in my collection.

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old style loose ball brampton headset

As a project it will be a lot of hard work, but could make a great looking ride once I lose that horrid blue house-paint colour !

Already I’ve had to drill out the frozen cotter pins and the fixed bottom bracket cup ain’t goin’ nowhere either… but it does look to be in good shape at least.

vintage drop outs, these - and i assume that's pet hair on the chain !

vintage drop outs, these – and i assume that’s pet hair on the chain !

Thinking, thinking …

See Ya !

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( As the late, great, Elvis used to say once upon a time… )

no, it's not mine - but i wish it was !

no, it’s not mine – but i wish it was !

And this Recyclist has certainly been a-rubbing a lot of hubs lately, perhaps in the forlorn hope that the Hard Rubbish Genie will grant him his wishes for an unloved De Rosa, Tommasini or similar to be cast aside, unloved, on the footpaths of his home town …

Anyhow, enough dreaming, it’s luck, observation, haste, and a trained bikey-nose that bring home the bacon on hard rubbish days.

I like the idea of having a mini-warehouse of preserved, restored, and useful parts, hopefully well organised and ready to hand at a moment’s notice. Not only that, but storing things as parts mean that one can do a proper and complete bike rebuild without having to scavenge through a whole yard full of rusty bikes. To be honest though, one has to be a bit selective as to which parts are : (a) most desirable, and / or (b) most likely to be useful in a future restoration considering the limited time one has available to pre-overhaul them.

recycled hub for apollo capri

recycled 95mm hub for apollo capri 27″

In the case of old hubs, it’s a good idea to get inside and check the bearings and cones, but you can usually feel any roughness at first by slowly turning the axle around with the thumb and index finger much like a “safe-cracker” feeling for the ‘combination’. If the bearings drag then either the hub is too tight or the bearings are shot, ( often both ! ) and usually the cones are pitted as well. A firm wiggle of the rim or axle will indicate any looseness or play. Any hard rubbish bike will likely need it’s hubs overhauled as the grease is inevitably dry ( and should be checked regardless ).

small flange steel 'chair' and generic high flange 95mm o.Ld.

36H small flange steel ‘chair’ and generic high flange 95mm o.Ld. hubs, 5/16″ axles.

Sometimes I find a ‘jackpot’ hub like this steel Japanese “Chair” brand from a Graecross Pro Ten that is in beautiful running order. Smooth races, shiny ball bearings and pit free cone tracks.

A thorough clean in solvent, the application of fresh grease, and re-assembly / re-adjustment … job done.

These hubs are really useful for restoring the more basic ‘ten-speeders’ as they have the 95mm locknut width and skinny 5/16″ axles to fit many low end to mid range 50s thru to 80s bikes as so often their axle is bent ( roll it on a flat surface ) or the cones are shot. Being a common 36 hole hub it will fit many classic (or even some more modern ) rims.

I make it a policy to save whatever straight and unworn parts I can off these front hubs – axles, shells, nuts, cones, etc. Yes I know that steel forks can be forced wider, but I prefer not to do that if I can avoid it. These skinny ‘roadster and sports-bike’ hubs will need careful adjustment and more frequent overhauls if they are to last.

I can never say enough times that if you want to be a serious recyclist you should be able to overhaul hubs, dismantle, clean and rebuild wheels. I’m so glad that I’ve learned the basics, for the sake of convenience – and my wallet. You will be too.

To clean hubs I use old toothbrushes, kerosene, rags, ( fine steel wool and rust converter for steel shells ), then to polish the shells it’s fine steel wool again, autosol, rags, and also calico cloth buffers on both a dremel tool and an electric drill.

ofmega road hubs

ofmega road hubs – classy looking, but fragile

A pair of Italian Ofmega road hubs look very much like classic Campagnolos in appearance with their steel oil hole cover clips. They are 100mm & 126mm over the locknuts and suitable for a 5 or 6 speed thread-on freewheel. Ofmega hubs are said to have more fragile cones and races than Shimano or Campagnolo. This is probably true, in my limited experience, but they do look great, with their elegant curves and milky alloy finish.

ofmega thread-on rear

ofmega thread-on rear

and the front ..,

and the front ..,

early shimano 600 pair

pretty & pretty bulletproof – early shimano 600 pair  w/uniglide rear

A pair of Shimano 600, the rear with an early Uniglide 5-speed freehub that takes a cassette where the smallest cog is the ‘locknut’ . I have a close ratio corncob 13-17T and 14-28T cassettes to match. Later Hyperglide cogs will fit these only if the wide positioning key / lug is filed down but you still need that final locking cog at the small end. 1980s Shimano 600 hubs are very well made, pretty, and long lasting too if routinely serviced.

thread-on sunshine rear hub - year unknown -1980s ?

thread-on sunshine rear hub – year unknown -1980s ?

Sunshine ( a.k.a Sansin ? ) is a brand I haven’t had much experience with, but this seems to be a decent mid-range rear. This hub was found to be in good internal condition and cleaned up nicely.

this suzue needs a better skewer

this suzue needs a better skewer

apert from that, it polished up ok

apart from that, it polished up ok

1975 normandy pair - cones and bearings required ..

1975 normandy pair – cones and bearings required ..

The high flange Suzue front and the 1975 Normandy pair needed new cones and bearings, though that’s not to say they all will. High flange hubs look great but as they use shorter spokes than low flange ones their wheels may be less compliant than equivalent small flangers. Although not the only factor for ride quality It’s worth considering your riding preferences and tyres with any particular frame-set you’re considering fitting them to.

shimano O-type coaster c.1984

shimano O-type coaster c.1984

This Shimano O-Type coaster has been more recently copied by other manufacturers such as Hi-Speed and Falcon, however this one seems lighter than the newer copies. As with any old coaster a front handbrake could be a good idea in modern traffic or if the coaster fails to brake well after rebuilding – and you won’t really know until it’s up and running. This one dates from around 1984 and is a good stopper.

the same coaster after overhaul

the same coaster after overhaul

Hopefully, the next few posts will feature a few bikes that are now wearing some of these hubs.

these hubs go on forever - almost

a sturmey archer, spotted out and about : these hubs go on forever – almost

Happy Re-Cycling !

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