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Archive for the ‘classic/vintage cycling trivia’ Category

the eadie coaster

the eadie coaster – somewhat loosened off

Here’s an interesting little gadget from many years ago – the Eadie Coaster hub. It’s of a different style to the familiar coasters of the 1960s and later, in that the brake part resembles a drum brake of fairly large diameter, but it’s initially operated by the typical drive screw it shares with the modern coaster brake family.

The later replacement for it was called the “BSA New Eadie” and came with the now familiar smaller diameter central expanding shoe.

I can remember riding a ladies’ bike as a child in the 60s that used one of these Eadie coasters, along with a ‘Hercules’ chain set. I can clearly remember the sliding oiler cover on the brake housing – and I think it was a fairly old bike even then !

the slotted drive-side flange

the slotted drive-side flange

Because of the narrow but large diameter shoe, the hub flanges are unequal sizes, and you’ll notice the unusual slotted spoke holes in the drive side flange. These slots allow a wheel to be built, or a drive-side spoke replaced, without either having to bend the spoke past the large flange or to remove the drive sprocket – clever, but necessary.

This also means that two fairly different lengths of spoke will have to be used to build up a wheel. Such oddities are where ‘Spokecalc’ comes in handy, as this hub wasn’t fitted to a wheel when I got it, so I have no idea of the spoke lengths required.

Eadie coasters were made between the early 20th century and the 1940s or so. The Eadie company was taken over by BSA in 1907, though the hub does not have any BSA logos on it at all.  I’m almost certain the hub isn’t pre-1907 though. There is a reasonable amount of related literature for Eadie coasters on the web.

the guts of it ...

the guts of it … note the matching teeth inside the shell and on the driven clutch

The tiny oiler cap in the hub centre is stamped “Abingdon Works” which was in Birmingham. Missing from the parts picture above are the 13 x 1/4″ loose ball bearings from the inner sprocket drive side. I was unable to remove the bearing cover from the sprocket outer ball cage, so I had to try and clean it in situ.

Although I haven’t actually used it yet, I’ve noticed that the design has a free-spinning quality to it, without the noticeable drag one gets when spinning a modern coaster hub.

Also, there is quite a strong spring-back when braking pressure is released, which may help account for this lack of friction.

another angle

another angle

This one is a 40-hole model so I need to find an appropriate rim, but I would like to use it on one of my loop-frame ladies’ models. It’s to be hoped that it works well enough on its own, but one never knows with a re-built coaster, at least not until one tries it out !

dahon dreaming again - @ swansea.

dahon dreaming again @ swansea.

On an unrelated topic, here’s a pic of my 1984 Dahon 3-speed taken on a recent outing. It cost me around $30AUD several years ago at a garage sale, and following a complete rebuild it became perhaps my most attention grabbing bike, at least as far as the non-cycling public is concerned.

It’s altogether Flexy, Frivolous and Fun !

Happy Re-Cycling !

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It’s funny how some of us who were into cycling in our younger days have returned to it as we’ve become older, and some such as myself still have a fascination with the bikes of our youth despite the many improvements in materials and technology since.

Anyone with money can walk into a bike shop and buy the latest and greatest, but some prefer the satisfying challenge of bringing an oldie back to life …

danny's healing bicycle

danny’s healing bicycle

One of the more interesting older bikes in the  Newcastle Tweed Ride this year was this Healing road bike.

A.G. Healing was a large cycle manufacturer in Melbourne, though this brand is much less common now in New South Wales than the more familiar Malvern Stars.  It seems, however, that at one time there were Healing outlets throughout Australia.

the non-drive side

the non-drive side

The company eventually moved out of cycles as did so many others as the industry began to decline, concentrating mainly on domestic appliances after 1959 when the bicycle division was sold. There is a reasonable amount of information about the company on the web – though, as usual, the detail on individual models is somewhat thin.

It seems that the top models had a brazed-on “H” on the head tube with very fancy lugs and colour schemes, with the medium-range models having a chrome badge like this one and the basic ones with a plain head tube.

The brand was raced by many well known Aussie cyclists ( including Russell Mockridge, one of the very best ) and they would have had the top ‘pro’ models, of course.

3 speeds - but not a planetary hub in sight

3 speeds and rear facing drop-outs – but not a planetary hub in sight.

This Healing has a 3-speed derailleur system that is an amazing mix of exposed clamps, springs and toggle chains. The drive chain is 1/8″, the same width as single speed, rather than the usual 3/32″ of  modern derailleur systems.

The cogs are also set further apart than is usual now, and I assume that with the limited number of ratios the wider chain doesn’t have to move far enough across the cluster to cause friction problems.

I can’t say I’ve had any experience with these older derailleur gears – they are a bit before my time !

neat shifter !

neat shifter !

The bike is running ‘singles’ ( i.e. tubular or ‘sew-up’ tyres ) as did the racers of the day and as do most racers now.

The owner, Danny, used to race bikes in his younger days and took up cycling again after he had quit long-term smoking and started to put on weight ( many of us can relate to that losing weight thing ! ). He now has a good sized collection of racing bikes from the early C20th to around 2000 – which would be great to see one day !
I didn’t get a lot of technical details about this bike, or even its age, but I think it’s a most enjoyable thing to behold.

Hopefully my somewhat hurriedly snapped photographs can convey a little of this.

The saddle is an Ideale, which was the French equivalent to Brooks – apparently this brand is undergoing a revival and will be releasing a new leather saddle too.

Happy Re-Cycling !

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the iconic kanga

the iconic kanga

The Australian “Bell” saddles were apparently made by the Pierce Bell Trading Company ( Sydney ), but sadly I haven’t found out much else about them on the web.

Apart from the one on my ’59 Conqueror loop frame, I have no real way of dating them.
It seems that the saddles were made from the early WW2 period to some time in the 1960s and were fitted to some Speedwell bikes, among others – and that’s about all I know.

I remember seeing these saddles in my childhood days, with the kangaroo image from the model ’12-40′ imprinted into my memory from some moment long ago.

model i.d. on the side

model i.d. on the side

They are nowhere near the construction quality of most Brooks saddles of the day and yet for me they remain desirable Australian cycling items…

the two 12-40 frame types

the two 12-40 frame types

I have a couple of types of the 12-40 roadster model – one with a single rail and the other with a double looped sprung rail much like the current Brooks B18 ‘Lady’ saddle.

classic 12-40 saddles

my classic 12-40 saddles – the leather dressing was made in singleton, nsw.

The Model 80 fitted to my 1959 Conqueror ladies is even more like the Brooks as it has a similar leather flap on the saddle nose as well as a lovely floral design including what looks like wattle flowers.

model 80 lady's

model 80 lady’s

the model 80 lady's

the model 80 lady’s from my ’59 conqueror loop frame

badge - model 80 lady's

badge – model 80 lady’s

Here’s a sportier ‘Model 70’ in a darker red-brown – roughly similar in shape to a Brooks B17 narrow :

the model 70

model 70

model 70

This one below is a model 40 – it is in reasonable shape except that the tension bolt is almost at its limit.

underside model 40

underside model 40

unusual shaped model 40

unusually shaped model 40

Only two saddles here are badged at the rear, the Model 80 Lady’s – which has a metal relief and black paint, and a single tatty 12-40 with a blue coloured badge of flat metal.

It’s a shame that there is so little history available on these saddles – can anyone point me to a catalogue or some other resource on-line ?

See Ya !

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cinelli stem badge

cinelli stem badge

The Recyclist’s bikey-nose sniffed out this beautiful steel Cinelli stem in a dusty Lambton garage – and on a tipoff.

Apparently Cinelli originally coloured their brass badges with fired glass enamelling ( cloisonne ), then later stem badges such as this ( and the head badges ) were painted, probably because of cost, again later finally moving to aluminium head badges, decals, simple engraving etc. in more modern times.

It is a miniature of the early Cinelli head badge “knight and shield” crest.
Current Cinelli products use the newer familiar graphic “winged C” motif.

as found - shame about the 'bars

as found – shame about the ‘bars

This long reach stem was connected to some Cinelli steel drop bars ( possibly Giro d’Italia model ) though these aren’t in useable condition having rusted through in the drops area. I’m guessing 1950s to 1960s, but can’t be sure.

many years of neglect ...

many years of neglect …

I think this is the 65 degree track stem – they also made a 73deg road stem and a drooping 58deg more extreme track version as well. Condition is not great and the stem bolt is somewhat rounded off – nevertheless, these are highly collectable items.

on the popular

on the popular

It now graces my ’56 Speedwell Popular, a somewhat mundane (but faithful) steed for such a regal stem.  At least the vintage is about right !

I fitted a steel Kusuki ‘Win’ Randonneur bar, as its shape and finish are about the best match I have for this stem.

love it !

love it !

A set of curly rams-horn style steel drop bars would look great – if I can find some !

a laid back frame

a laid back frame

The laid back angles of this bike mean that the stem drop is not so pronounced, and the rando bars give back a little height.

some traces of original paint remain

some traces of original paint remain

In spite of ( or partly because of ) its worn paint condition and less than perfect chrome, it is still a thing of beauty to behold …

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the 'black and white TV' of  cycle computers ?

not exactly an ‘SRM’ — more the ‘black and white TV’ of cycle computers..

Heavy, bulky, and not very accurate were my first impressions from this recent find, but perhaps in the 1980s it was state of the art ? The device runs on 2 x AA batteries ( which were thankfully not too corrosive to have destroyed it – despite it having being unused for over 10 years ).

cateye velo & road king ( new version ! )

cateye velo & road king ( preview of new version ! )

The CC-1000 lacks a clock display, though it does have a stopwatch function. There is an SCN setting that cycles through all the displays – far too quickly for me – plus ODO, DST, SPD, Time, AVS & MXS readings. Speed is indicated by an LCD bar graph at the top of the display just below the coloured speed line, as well as numerically when set on the ‘SPD’ setting. LCD icons appear above each function’s abbreviation to indicate which display is operating.

rear of unit

rear of unit

In use, the speedo’s response is very slow, and somewhat pessimistic on speed and distance – compared with my modern computers. The sender is a ring attached at 3 points to the front wheel spokes, with different screw holes supplied for 36 spoke and 28 spoke wheels.

computer ring and sensor

computer ring and sensor

The 3 buttons are ‘MODE’ “RESET” and “START/STOP”. An adjuster on the back has presets for 20, 22, 24, 26, 27 and 28 inch wheels ( no 700c ! ). According to Velobase it came with an adjusting tool for the wheel size presets, and a carry pouch !

the wheel size adjuster

the wheel size adjuster

I find the stopwatch function useful for trip times, but really, the best use of this classic computer is to make an 80s rebuild like my 59cm Road King look and feel a little more period authentic ! More about this bike later ..

road king 'semi-tourist'

road king ‘semi-tourist’

Happy Re-cycling !

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